twirlingflutterby:

vegan-yums:

Avocado Eggrolls Recipe :: Vegan rolls / Recipe

Mmmmm needz to attempt.

OMG drooling. we are trying these during visits. le MUST

(Source: vegan-yums)


twirlingflutterby:

True romance.

excited to be morticia and gomez for christmaeasterween in january, but maybe i should be gomez?? 

(Source: sandandglass)

And I urge you to please notice when you are happy, and exclaim or murmur or think at some point, ‘If this isn’t nice, I don’t know what is.’
Kurt Vonnegut, A Man Without a Country (via feellng)

gooftroopin:

me:

image

you:

image

i laugh at this everyyyy time


supersonicart:

Chen Dao Lee.

Fantastic paintings by Taiwanese artist Chen Dao Lee.  The “fallen heroes” and boxing women appear as symbols of inner contradiction.  See many more awesome pieces below:

Read More


blaaaaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrghhhhhhhhhhh

(Source: supermans)


sailoreverything:

charmingdeadpool:

My brother really loves Sailor Moon, so he wanted to go as tuxedo mask at a con we recently went to. I tried to do a serious photoshoot with him, but he wouldn’t really stay still :/ He was a hit with the ladies though. 

You can really feel how cool that outfit makes him feel. It’s really awesome.

well, this kid is obviously the coolest


jedavu:

IMMERSIVE 360° INSTALLATION OF VIRTUAL UNIVERSE

This amazing work, Nimbes, was created by Joanie Lemercier, an audiovisual artist.

Growth is painful. Change is painful.But nothing is as painful as staying stuck somewhere you don’t belong.

Mandy Hale (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

thinking of you today myresponses <3 <3

10 Scientific Concepts That Scientists Wish You Would Stop Misusing

jtotheizzoe:

The folks at io9 have collected some of our most commonly misused scientific terms , from “theory” vs. “hypothesis” to “innate” vs. “learned” and a helping side of “natural” vs. “artificial”, all with explanations from prominent thinkers on exactly how those words are used in the language of Sciencese.

This is important, because many of the words and concepts that we use in scientific discourse have completely different meanings in everyday language. and knowing the difference can prevent a lot of misunderstandings. For instance, how things like evolution and man-made climate change could still be “theories” despite being overwhelmingly supported by scientific observation and really not up for argument. 

Previously: See my answer to a question sent in from a reader about the difference between a theory, a law, and a hypothesis.

shout out to what the bleep for being the worst ever